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About Roses and Empuriabrava

Roses

Roses has the largest fishing fleet on the Costa Brava, but like so many other towns along Catalonia’s coast its main income nowadays is derived from tourism.

The town is particularly popular for its splendid beaches and loved for its unique location: it is the only beach resort facing west, which means tourists and locals alike get to enjoy fantastic sunsets across the Gulf of Roses.

Not much is known about the history of Roses, but it is generally accepted that the place is some 3,000 years old. Some say the village was founded in 8 BC by Greek settlers from Rhodes, others claim Roses got its start in 5 BC when a number of Greeks came over from Massalia (present day Marseilles). The monastery of Santa Maria de Roses is mentioned for the first time in a document from the year 944 AD, and archaeologists says the mediaeval town grew around this monastery. In other words, no one knows for sure when the village was founded. The monastery of Santa Maria de Roses is mentioned for the first time in a document from the year 944 AD, and archaeologists says the mediaeval town grew around this monastery. In other words, no one knows for sure when the village was founded.

Much later Roses housed a Roman colony, and in the 16th century Charles V had a citadel built south of the town of which the walled ruins can still be seen today. In the Middle Ages Roses was an important military port.

Roses offers some archaeological attractions such as the ruins of the Trinitat Castle; the remains of a Visigoth campsite; and the dolmen (tombs) of Creu d’en Corbetalla, which are part of the biggest megalithic monuments in Catalonia.

Water sports are very popular here as well, and the Bay of Roses offers more than 45 km of beaches.

Many visitors enjoy walking in the quiet mountain landscape of Cap de Creus. The local tourist office has brochures with different routes, along with information about precautions you should take if you venture into the mountain area.

Empuriabrava

Empuriabrava is one of the most unusual towns along the Costa Brava; sporting nearly 24 km (15 miles) of canals, and 5,000 private jetties, Empuriabrava is the largest residential marina in the world.

Reminiscent of Venice or Miami, Empuriabrava is a major, upmarket tourist destination. It is particularly popular with Germans and the French, and, to a much lesser extent, the Dutch and the British. As you might expect, there’s a vibrant nightlife scene with bars, discos and a range of restaurants, the latter mostly aimed at foreigners eager to enjoy familiar food.

Normally home to 7,800 local residents, at the height of the summer season, the town’s population swells to nearly 80,000 people.
The town’s main draws, aside from providing a playground for rich yacht owners, are:
• A great beach; Platja Empuriabrava is 1.5 km long and 90 m wide
• A whole scale of water sports from sailing, surfing, windsurfing, water-skiing and para skiing to fishing, diving to name a few
• Fantastic skydiving; just north of the town is Europe’s most famous skydiving school, considered to be among the three best in the world

Most tourists and day-trippers rent sailboats or motorised boats or, at the very least, take a canal boat tour. The town also provides an ideal base from which to explore the Parc Natural dels Aiguamolls de l’Empordà, a beautiful nature reserve that pretty much surrounds it. Many tourists come specifically to enjoy the bicycle and hiking routes.

Whilst Empuriabrava itself doesn’t have much history or, for that matter, charm, the old cities of Figueres (15 km) and Girona (55 km), as well as the town of Cadaqués (23 km), are nearby. The French border, at 40 km, is also close by. Centre to centre, Roses is only a 9 km drive, providing ample restaurants and bars. No building in Empuriabrava is over 40 years old, but to see old buildings in a setting that evokes that old Catalonia feeling, you can always visit the small medieval town of Castelló d’Empúries, of which Empuriabrava actually is a suburb. Whilst they’re only 2 km apart, the contrast between the former and the latter, which dates back to the ninth century, couldn’t be greater.

The Epicentre of European Football

With world-class museums, magnificent architecture, lively restaurants and bars and much, much more, the Costa Brava in Spain has a lot going for it. Add to that an incredible footballing history and you have a place like no other.

Barcelona is home to one of the world’s most famous and attractive football clubs which makes it a key location on the European football map. Add FC Girona, the new arrival to La Liga (the Spanish Premier league), and Catalonia, becomes one of the epicentres of European Football.

There are five main football leagues in Spain:

La Liga/La Liga Santander
La Liga is the highest level in the Spanish football league system and is operated by the LFP.

La Liga 2/La Liga 1|2|3
La Liga 2 is the second highest level in the Spanish football league system and is also operated by the LFP.

Segunda División B
The Segunda Division B is the third highest level in the Spanish football league system and is operated by the Royal Spanish Football Federation.

Tercera División
The Tercera Division is the fourth highest level in the Spanish football league system and is operated by the Royal Spanish Football Federation and 17 regional federations.

Lower Regional divisions
Some of the best well known Spanish football clubs are FC Barcelona, Espanyol, FC Girona, Real Madrid, Atletico Madrid, Valencia, Sevilla…

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